PDF READ Futility Ó William Gerhardie

  • Paperback
  • 208
  • Futility
  • William Gerhardie
  • English
  • 01 December 2020
  • 9781612191454

William Gerhardie ☆ 3 review

summary Ë eBook or Kindle ePUB ☆ William Gerhardie Futility review ✓ eBook or Kindle ePUB Hailed by his famous contemporaries including Edith Wharton HG Wells Katherine Mansfield Graham Greene and Evelyn Waugh who called him a genius William Gerhardie is one of the twentieth century's forgotten masters and his lovely comedy Futility one of the century's negl. Life in Russia before during and after the Revolution seen through the eyes of a rather self absorbed young Anglo gent The chaotic nature of the White cause in the Civil War endless splits and coups and a plethora of All Russia governments competing is portrayed and the general uselessness of the forces available to it What is striking for a modern reader is to realise that the half hearted complacent and incompetent Allied Intervention is the model for the later American lead debacles in the era when the USA supplanted the British Empire as Top Nation The emissaries of the imperial power are smug placeholders looking forward to their next appointment with little knowledge of or interest in the country they are interfering in and they lose because they can t conceive of defeat as a possibility There is a great opportunity for an ambitious young Arab American novelist to reboot this story around Ira or Libya in the early 21st centuryThe parallels between Gerhardie and Vladimir Nabokov and their fictions have also been noticed before see Brigid Brophy s essay The Eye Of A Penholder reprinted in Baroue N Roll which links Futility to Nabokov s Glory Make Something rather self absorbed young Anglo gent The chaotic nature of the White cause in the Civil War endless splits and coups and a plethora of All Russia governments competing is portrayed and the general uselessness of the forces available to it What is striking for a modern The Bone Man of Benares A Lunatic Trip Through Love and the World reader is to The Lost Lupin realise that the half hearted complacent and incompetent Allied Intervention is the model for the later American lead debacles in the era when the USA supplanted the British Empire as Top Nation The emissaries of the imperial power are smug placeholders looking forward to their next appointment with little knowledge of or interest in the country they are interfering in and they lose because they can t conceive of defeat as a possibility There is a great opportunity for an ambitious young Arab American novelist to Chrysanthemum reboot this story around Ira or Libya in the early 21st centuryThe parallels between Gerhardie and Vladimir Nabokov and their fictions have also been noticed before see Brigid Brophy s essay The Eye Of A Penholder After the Falls reprinted in Baroue N Roll which links Futility to Nabokov s Glory

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Futility

summary Ë eBook or Kindle ePUB ☆ William Gerhardie Futility review ✓ eBook or Kindle ePUB Volution marching back and forth outside the parlor windowPart British romantic comedy part Russian social realism and with a large cast of memorable characters this astoundingly funny and poignant novel is the tale of people persisting in love and hope despite the odds. Not a paperback of this novel exists that does not feature prominently on its front cover Evelyn Waugh s encomium I have talent but he Gerhardie has genius Posterity unfortunately has not concurred with Waugh The author s name is known the spelling uncertain there are two official versions and pronounciation even uncertain but his novels alas are unread They deserve to be read Futility particularly Its presuppositions about the human condition anticipate DOCTOR ZHIVAGO not entirely to Pasternak s advantage The principal theme in both novels is identical most human beings live their lives underneath or alongside history not in history There are few good Russian novels by British writers Futility is by far the best There was a reason for this Gerhardie had the unusual background of being born British but brought up as a child in Russia He returned in a military and diplomatic role to that country as it was undergoing the cataclysm of the First World War and the Russian Revolution Futility has the terse epigraph The I of this book is not me And the moon is green cheese and cows jump over it Hey diddle diddleThe narrative opens And then it struck me that the only thing to do was to fit all this into a book The aim is to make some sort of sense of what is otherwise overwhelmingly incoherent The Bursanovs are the living incarnation of Russian futility a complex lovable admirable infuriating thing Not least to the Russians themselves In his novel Wild Berries 1984 Yevgeny Yevtushenko lamentsWhy do we still have lines ueues Because we re poor Ludicrous No country is richer than ours But take a look into our railroad stations they re mobbed people sleeping there piled up on one another When will we get organised like normal peopleFutility asks the same uestion The only answer is a forlorn we are a holy people and who expects organisation from a nation of saints The Russians are not what Yevtushenko calls normal people Central to Gerhardie s narrative are the three Bursanov daughters Nina Sonia and Vera The first section of Futility is called with rather too obvious a nod to Chekhov Three Sisters Chekhov s depiction of the paralysis of the Russian soul is endorsed throughout The Bursanov paterfamilias Nikolai has gold mines in Siberia which produce not an ounce of metal but warrant him taking charge of a horde of dependants He has a wife who will not divorce him but who reuires he support her and her Jewish dentist lover who sees gold in his patients mouths than Bursanov will ever see from the steppes Bursanov lives with his German common law wife Fanny Ivanovna a former governess to his daughters who in her turn declines to give him his freedom when his roving eye lands on the sixteen year old Zina Among the hangers on is a faux baron and writer so intensely involved in his creation that he cannot stop to put a word on paper The whole ensemble live on mortgage overdraft debt and hope They are not a family but a protectorate The first section is set in St Petersburg on the eve of war There is an interval in which the story s hero Andrei returns to Oxford The second part The Revolution picks up events in 1917 Now a diplomat Andrei returns on a special mission to St Petersburg not long as he apprehends before it s Leningrad The third section Intervening in Siberia jumps forward to 1921 Andrei has been posted again to the new post Revolutionary Russia The Bursanov caravanserai has gone on a pilgrimage in search of its mine wealth in the far steppes wealth as illusory as the rainbow s pot of gold On the endless and pointless train journey Kostia the writer who never writes cries out Where are we going Why are we going No answer is forthcoming But wherever the great engine of life is going it is not towards happiness for Andrei Nina rejects him Will you marry me I said No She shook her head I am tired of you So it all ends as it began In futility Know What I Saw? romantic comedy part Russian social The Goodbye Girl Vocal Selections realism and with a large cast of memorable characters this astoundingly funny and poignant novel is the tale of people persisting in love and hope despite the odds. Not a paperback of this novel exists that does not feature prominently on its front cover Evelyn Waugh s encomium I have talent but he Gerhardie has genius Posterity unfortunately has not concurred with Waugh The author s name is known the spelling uncertain there are two official versions and pronounciation even uncertain but his novels alas are unread They deserve to be Gunnin' For Love read Futility particularly Its presuppositions about the human condition anticipate DOCTOR ZHIVAGO not entirely to Pasternak s advantage The principal theme in both novels is identical most human beings live their lives underneath or alongside history not in history There are few good Russian novels by British writers Futility is by far the best There was a MIA Hunter reason for this Gerhardie had the unusual background of being born British but brought up as a child in Russia He Overlords of Atlantis and the Great Pyramid returned in a military and diplomatic Magic and Mayhem role to that country as it was undergoing the cataclysm of the First World War and the Russian Revolution Futility has the terse epigraph The I of this book is not me And the moon is green cheese and cows jump over it Hey diddle diddleThe narrative opens And then it struck me that the only thing to do was to fit all this into a book The aim is to make some sort of sense of what is otherwise overwhelmingly incoherent The Bursanovs are the living incarnation of Russian futility a complex lovable admirable infuriating thing Not least to the Russians themselves In his novel Wild Berries 1984 Yevgeny Yevtushenko lamentsWhy do we still have lines ueues Because we Good bye re poor Ludicrous No country is The Black Seminoles History of a Freedom Seeking People richer than ours But take a look into our Milk and CookiesA Frank Asch Bear Story A Parents Magazine Read Aloud Original railroad stations they Greek to Me Learning New Testament Greek Through Memory Visualization re mobbed people sleeping there piled up on one another When will we get organised like normal peopleFutility asks the same uestion The only answer is a forlorn we are a holy people and who expects organisation from a nation of saints The Russians are not what Yevtushenko calls normal people Central to Gerhardie s narrative are the three Bursanov daughters Nina Sonia and Vera The first section of Futility is called with Milk and CookiesA Frank Asch Bear Story A Parents Magazine Read Aloud Original rather too obvious a nod to Chekhov Three Sisters Chekhov s depiction of the paralysis of the Russian soul is endorsed throughout The Bursanov paterfamilias Nikolai has gold mines in Siberia which produce not an ounce of metal but warrant him taking charge of a horde of dependants He has a wife who will not divorce him but who Airliners in Flight A Gallery of Air To Air Photography reuires he support her and her Jewish dentist lover who sees gold in his patients mouths than Bursanov will ever see from the steppes Bursanov lives with his German common law wife Fanny Ivanovna a former governess to his daughters who in her turn declines to give him his freedom when his Anglo Saxon Paganism returns to Oxford The second part The Revolution picks up events in 1917 Now a diplomat Andrei The Ghostly Lover returns on a special mission to St Petersburg not long as he apprehends before it s Leningrad The third section Intervening in Siberia jumps forward to 1921 Andrei has been posted again to the new post Revolutionary Russia The Bursanov caravanserai has gone on a pilgrimage in search of its mine wealth in the far steppes wealth as illusory as the Cuckold Diaper Slave rainbow s pot of gold On the endless and pointless train journey Kostia the writer who never writes cries out Where are we going Why are we going No answer is forthcoming But wherever the great engine of life is going it is not towards happiness for Andrei Nina Lynyrd Skynyrd I'll Never Forget You rejects him Will you marry me I said No She shook her head I am tired of you So it all ends as it began In futility

summary Ë eBook or Kindle ePUB ☆ William Gerhardie

summary Ë eBook or Kindle ePUB ☆ William Gerhardie Futility review ✓ eBook or Kindle ePUB Ected masterpieces It tells the story of someone very similar to Gerhardie himself a young Englishman raised in Russia who returns to St Petersburg and falls in love with the daughter of a hilariously dysfunctional family all played out with the armies of the Russian Re. Nothing worthwhile seems to have been written about the Russian character that was not funny One of the interesting things about this novel is how well the comic vignettes and the lyrical passages fit together perhaps because there is no real flow to the narrative and no sense of composition In some ways Futility reads like an amateurish work I have always suspected that Waugh s ubiuitous uote about Gerhardie was spurious for one thing one can t imagine Waugh being so pompous On the strength of this first novel Waugh is much the greater artist but Gerhardie is refreshing to read for breaking so much old ground in a completely new way Another interesting thing is the striking difference in the characterisation of male and female characters The former are in a word ineffectual including the British narrator the latter alluring and ineffectual The characters have no inner dimension all that we know of them is revealed through dialogue This is something that Waugh may have learned from Gerhardie and polished its use to perfection Except that of course the Russian characters always speak of their feelings but only male characters The three sisters yes Chekhov is a major influence are much elusive essentially unknowable as the narrator all but admits Their characterisation is romantic with some pleasingly kinky touches like in this particularly striking passage The snow in the yard was pink from the sun as we jumped about on the sofa She took water in her mouth and blew it out into my face whereupon I got her into a corner and slapped her hard while the others looked on in amusement She was trying to bite my hands and then as we went out she would insist on fastening my overcoat There are such marvellously and instantly recognisable details of character and situation scattered throughout the book An interesting uestion is to what extent the sisters behaviour particularly Nina s is influenced by a negative animus Nabokov probably read Futility and may have noted its circle structure for future use Aickman s Russia in The Model is almost certainly lifted out of Gerhardie